B A T _ C O U N T R Y

You can't stop here.

Reblogged from bloochikin  15,690 notes

givememountaindew:

Ok, so, I am giant nerd and when I got home tonight I thought it would be great to spend my evening mapping out CN original shows and their life spans from the past 20 years. 

image

Honestly I was curious if there was any pattern in style and content but all I found out was Ed, Edd, and Eddy was a BAMF of a show that lived forever.

'99 was the golden year tbh

Reblogged from idwcomics  97 notes

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:
Michael Crowe recommends Monster & Madman 

Jack the Ripper was in the headlines again last week, with claims surfacing of new DNA evidence pinning the 1888 London murder spree on Polish barber Aaron Kosminski.  Writer Steve Niles (arcaneimages) and artist Damien Worm, however, have another theory.

Monster & Madman tells the tale of Frankenstein’s monster, following the events of Mary Shelley’s classic novel.  Rather than burn himself to death on Victor Frankenstein’s funeral pyre, as he told the novel’s narrator he would, the monster decides to continue his life—as wretched as it is—and finds passage from the Arctic on a ship bound for Norway.

The monster eventually makes his way to London in 1888, just as a string of grisly murders is beginning to terrify the populace.  There he strikes a deal with mortician John Moore; if the monster allows Moore to examine him and discover the secrets of Victor Frankenstein’s work, Moore will grant the monster what Victor denied him: the creation of a companion to ease his loneliness.

Of course, Moore has his own secrets and motives, and his source for female body parts may not be the generous local hospital as he claims.

Steve Niles’ writing is in turns eerie and melancholy, matching Shelley’s original text in terms of both writing style as well as his characterization of the monster.

What makes Monster & Madman really shine, however, is definitely Damien Worm’s gorgeously grotesque artwork.  Worm’s moody collages of ink, paint, and newspaper clippings set a perfect tone for this creepy tale, and work wonderfully in letting the viewer see the world through the monster’s borrowed, reanimated eyes.

For fans of the Shelley’s classic novel, or of dark and moody horror in general, Monster & Madman is highly recommended.

[Read Monster & Madman on comiXology]

Mike Isenberg is an Associate Production Coordinator at comiXology, and the co-writer of First Law Of Mad Science.  He lives in Harlem with his cats, Tesla and Edison

TONIGHT TONIGHT TONIGTH!!!

  1. clean & shine boots
  2. laundry
  3. clean out & organize: bookcases, comic box, movie cabinet, dresser, closet
  4. dust
  5. mop
  6. re-paint nails (V. IMPORTANT!)
  7. write up Christmas shopping list
  8. re-trim hair
  9. write back Evie & Rodney
  10. figure out new insurance stuff & prep for orientation week
  11. go to bed & get uP EARLY to go in for O/T
Reblogged from phootyraskel  715 notes

cross-connect:

Featured Curator of the Week : Archan Nair [archanN]

Born in Russia, Vania Zouravliov was inspired from an early age by influences as diverse as The Bible, Dante‚ Divine Comedy, early Disney animation and North American Indians. His elaborate illustrations are a mix of innocence, brutality, beauty and decadence, mixed with the colors and styles of communism in Eastern Europe.

Something of a child prodigy in his homeland, he was championed by many influential classical musicians including Ashkenazi, Spivakov, Menuhin and at the age of 13 years was known internationally. His first monograph was published recently by Gestalten. Currently living and working in the United Kingdom.